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Films

Classic Film: The Trouble With Harry (1955, 99 min)
May 26, 2015
7:00 pm
The trouble with Harry is that he's dead. The scene is an autumnal Vermont village, where a pre-Leave It to Beaver Jerry Mathers stumbles upon Harry's corpse in the woods. Mathers alerts his mother Shirley MacLaine (making her film debut), who recognizes Harry as her ex-husband. Later on, retired sea captain Edmund Gwenn likewise comes across the moribund Harry. Both MacLaine and Gwenn have reason to believe that they're responsible for Harry's demise. Alfred Hitchcock rarely allowed his dry and barbed sense of humor to rise to the surface as fully as in The Trouble With Harry, one of his only real comedies, and a film that he often cited as a personal favorite.—All Movie
Documentary: Dinosaur 13 (2014, 95 minutes)
June 01, 2015
2:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m.
Todd Douglas Miller's documentary "Dinosaur 13" focuses on Peter Larson, a paleontologist whose life changes after he unearths the largest and most well-preserved Tyrannosaurus Rex fossil ever found. He ended up having to do legal battle with other scientists, as well as with the government, in order to keep control over his historic discovery.—All Movie
Classic Film: The Razor's Edge (1946, 145 min)
June 02, 2015
7:00 pm
After several years' service with the Marines in World War II, Tyrone Power made his much anticipated return to the screen in The Razor's Edge. Power is appropriately cast as disillusioned World War I vet Larry Darrell, who returns from hostilities questioning his old values. To find himself, Larry joins several other members of the Lost Generation in Paris. He is disillusioned once more when the society deb whom he loves, Isabel Bradley (Gene Tierney), marries another for wealth and position.—All Movie
Foreign Film: Marius (France, 2013, 93 minutes)
June 15, 2015
2:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m.
The original film version of “Marius” (1931) was the first in a classic trilogy (“The Marseille Trilogy’) directed by Marcel Pagnol. The second and third films were “Fanny” (1932) and “César” (1936). “Marius” and “Fanny” were adapted from plays written by Pagnol, whereas Pagnol wrote “César” exclusively for the screen. Popular French actor and director Daniel Auteuil has undertaken to remake all three films. Thus far, his versions of “Marius” (2013) and “Fanny” (2013) have been released, and the release of “César” is expected sometime later this year. “Marius” is set in Marseille in the early 1900s. The young man of the film’s title works in his father, Cesar’s, portside bar and dreams of setting off to sea; but when Fanny, the woman he loves, begins courting an older man to make him jealous, Marius is torn between true love and his longtime passion for a life at sea.
Foreign Film: Fanny (France, 2013, 102 minutes)
July 20, 2015
2:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m.
Popular French actor and director Daniel Auteuil has undertaken to remake Marcel Pagnol’s classic Marseille film trilogy, which consisted of “Marius” (1931), “Fanny” (1932), and “César” (1936). Auteuil’s versions of “Marius” and “Fanny” were both released in 2013; the release of “César” is expected sometime later this year. “Marius” is set in Marseille in the early 1900s. In “Marius,” a young man, Marius, who works in his father’s harbor-side bar, dreams of a life at sea; but when Fanny, the woman he loves, begins courting a kindly, well-off, older man named Panisse in order to make him jealous, Marius is torn between true love and his longtime passion for the sailor’s life. After much soul searching, Marius decides to go to sea, not knowing that Fanny is pregnant by him. In “Fanny,” Fanny must decide whether to wait for Marius’s hoped for return or accept the marriage proposal of Panisse, her elderly suitor. The final film in the trilogy, “César” concerns itself with Marius’ father, César. “César” will be included in the Friends foreign film series if and when it becomes available.

For more information about these films, visit the All Movie Guide (http://www.allmovie.com) or the Internet Movie Database (http://imdb.com).

Above Films will be shown in the Audio-Visual Room at the Cranford Community Center (220 Walnut Avenue). Free admission. All are welcome. Wheel-chair accessible. Sponsored by the Friends of the Cranford Public Library.



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